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Tufts Institute of the Environment is proud to work with faculty from across Tufts’ different departments and schools and with professionals world-wide. This is a list of faculty that we have worked with and who support our initiatives.


School of Arts and Sciences

Anthropology Department

Alex Blanchette

Assistant Professor
Anthropology

Dr. Blanchette is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Anthropology with an expertise in industrial agriculture, animal studies, ethnography of labor, and food studies. His current research focuses on the capitalist natures and industrialization of labor and life in what is supposedly a post-industrial United States. His book-in-progress, Porkopolis: Standardized Life, American Animality, and the “Factory” Farm works to show that the industrial pig has become the product of a constant battle over the state of American animality.

Zarin Machanda

Assistant Professor
Anthropology

Dr. Machanda is an Assistant Professor in the Tufts University Department of Anthropology. Her current research focuses on the quality and development of social relationships among wild chimpanzees. She studies different relationships that form in chimpanzee societies, and focuses mostly on the evolution of male-female relationships, male-male cooperation, and how chimpanzees are using communication to maintain and mediate social relationships. Currently, Dr. Machanda is working on a long-term project to study infant and juvenile chimpanzees and how they develop sex-type adult relationships.

Earth and Ocean Sciences

Andrew Kemp

Assistant Professor
Earth & Ocean Sciences

Dr. Kemp is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Earth and Ocean Sciences, focusing in Coastal Processes and Climate Change. His research attempts to give detailed reconstructions of sea level over the last 2000 years and to determine the response of local, regional, and global sea level to known climate deviations. These deviations include the Medieval Climate Anomaly, Little Ice Age, and the 20th century warming. Dr. Kemp uses coastal statigraphy, biological and geochemical proxies, varied dating methods and quantitative paleoenvironmental techniques to study sea level.

Economics

Kelsey Jack

Assistant Professor
Environmental Economics

Dr. Jack is an Assistant Professor in the Tufts University Department of Economics, specializing in Environmental Economics. Her research focuses on the intersection of environmental and development economics and looks to answer questions from behavioral economics and contract theory. Her current projects study the design of incentives for the private provision of public goods, relating to issues of environment and health in Malawi, Zambia, and Bolivia.

William Masters

Professor
Friedman School of Nutrition Science & Policy; Economics

Dr. Masters is a Professor in the Friedman School, and the Tufts University Department of Economics. He received his master’s and Ph. D from the Food Research Institute at Stanford University. His research focuses on utilizing economic methods to inform and improve the food system, especially those in developing countries. He has worked as an editor for Agricultural Economics and is a co-author of the book, Economics of Agricultural Development: World Food Systems and Resource Use.

Gilbert Metcalf

Professor
Economics

Dr. Metcalf is a Professor of Economics at Tufts University. Metcalf’s main research focus is applied public finance with an emphasis in taxation, energy, and environmental economics. Currently, his research is focused on policy evaluation and design in the field of energy and climate change. In 2011 and 2012, he worked as the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Environment and Energy at the U.S. Department of the Treasury, where he was the founding U.S. Board Member for the UN based Green Climate Fund.

Jeff Zabel

Professor
Economics

Dr. Zabel is a professor in the Department of Economics, with an expertise in econometrics, labor economics, and environmental economics. Zabel’s research focus includes the economics involved in social interactions, the economics of housing, the valuation of environmental goods, the economics of brownfields, the economics of education, and welfare analysis. His publications include papers such as, Estimating the Demand for Air Quality in Four United States Cities and The Effects of Critical Habitat Designation in Housing Supply: An Analysis of California Housing Construction Activity.

English

Modhumita Roy

Associate Professor
English

Dr. Roy is an Associate Professor in the Tufts University English Department. Her research interests include Anglophone literatures of Africa and the African Diaspora, South Asian literature, literatures of empires, post-colonial theory, feminist theory, and literary theory. Roy’s publications include topics of undocumented workers and the social costs of mothering within contemporary texts, as well as the outsourcing of reproduction in the age of globalization.

Environmental Studies

Ninian R. Stein

Professor
Environmental Studies

Dr. Stein is a Professor in the Tufts Environmental Studies Program. She specializes in three fields within Environmental Studies: environmental policy and communication, landscape change, and environmental justice. Stein’s current research works to build decision-making frameworks for communities interested in increasing their sustainability by using and preserving environmental resources in a sustainable manner. She is currently partnered with Grove Hall Main Streets to test her team’s Bioregional Urbanist methodology in the field.

Mathematics

Bruce Boghosian

Professor
Department of Mathematics

Professor Boghosian is a professor in the Tufts Department of Mathematics, with a particular knowledge in the field of theoretical and computational fluid dynamics, and quantum computation. His research focuses on theoretical and computational fluid dynamics, emphasizing a better understanding of fluid turbulence. This problem is addressed through the dynamical systems approach to fluid dynamics, lattice models of fluid dynamics, topological fluid dynamics, and vortex dynamics in two and three dimensions.


School of Engineering

Biomedical Engineering

Florenzo Omento

Dean of Research
School of Engineering

Dr. Omenetto is the Dean of Research in the School of Engineering and a professor in the Department of Biomedical Engineering. His research focuses on the interdisciplinary themes that span nonlinear optics, nanostructured materials, optofluidics and biopolymer based photonics. His lab has created the use of silk as a material platform for photonics, optoelectronics and high-technology applications and is researching new applications that rely on this new technology base.

Chemical and Biological Engineering

Ayse Asatekin

Assistant Professor
Chemical and Biological Engineering

Dr. Asatekin is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering at Tufts. She received her bachelor’s degree in chemical engineering and chemistry from the Middle East Technical University, followed by her Ph. D in chemical engineering at MIT. Dr. Asatekin’s research focuses in the design of membranes for water treatment, separation of small molecules, removal of pollutants, and energy-efficient water filtration. Her interests include systems that combine separation with catalysis and bioprocessing, and self-cleaning materials with controlled wetting.

Maria Flytzani-Stephanopoulos:

Professor
Chemical & Biological Engineering

Dr. Flytzani-Stephanopoulos is a Professor of Chemical and Biological Engineering at the Tufts School of Engineering. Her research focus includes catalysis, clean energy technologies, and material science. She works in the Nano Catalysis and Energy Laboratory, which studies new catalyst materials to produce hydrogen and ‘green’ chemicals. This lab has demonstrated single atom catalysts for reactions, meaning that sustainable use of precious metals could be achieved in clean energy production.

Matthew Panzer

Associate Professor
Chemical & Biological Engineering

Dr. Panzer is an Associate Professor in the Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering at Tufts. He received his Ph. D in Chemical Engineering from the University of Minnesota. Panzer’s research focuses on developing an understanding of how solution-processed, nanoscale materials can be effectively incorporated into novel electrochemical devices for the efficient generation, storage, and responsible use of electrical energy. The research is chiefly driven by the great challenge facing the world to develop clean and sustainable energy solutions and options.

Civil and Environmental Engineering

Anne Marie C. Desmarais

Lecturer
Civil & Environmental Engineering

Professor C. Desmarais lectures in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering. She has worked as a Vice President of Environmental Risk Management at a consulting firm and has directed hazardous waste site investigations and remediation. Her research interests are in human health risk assessment and exposure modeling. She provides technical assistance to communities and works on community environmental education by helping community groups better understand hazardous waste site cleanups within their neighborhoods.

Eric Hines

Professor of Practice
Civil & Environmental Engineering

Dr. Hines is a Professor of Practice in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at Tufts. He focuses in the design and renovation of building structures, and the infrastructure needed for renewable energy. His recent project has been as owner representation on the Marine Commerce Terminal, which is the nation’s first offshore wind logistics port. Dr. Hines has also worked in design of the Wind Technology Testing Center. He is interested in the construction and performance of offshore wind turbines, and inelastic behavior of reinforced concrete structures.

Richard Hooper

Research Professor
Civil & Environmental Engineering

Dr. Hooper is a research professor at Tufts University in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering. His research interests include water informatics, hillside hydrology and catchment biochemistry, information systems, and community-based research infrastructure. He is also an executive director of the Consortium of Universities for the Advancement of the Hydrological Sciences, in which his research interests are in advancing water informatics to make data readily accessible to water research.

Jonathan Lamontagne

Assistant Professor
Civil & Environmental Engineering

Dr. Lamontagne is an Assistant Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering at Tufts University. He received his master’s and Ph. D in environmental water resource systems analysis from Cornell University. His research focuses include the study of water resources, decision making under uncertainty, hydrologic statistics, and integrated global change assessment. After his graduate work, Dr. Lamontagne worked as a research associate, studying uncertainty and robustness issues for models of the integrated human-climate system.

Daniele Lantagne

Associate Professor
Civil & Environmental Engineering

Dr. Lantagne is an Associate Professor in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at Tufts University. She earned her bachelor’s and master’s from MIT and her Ph. D from the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine. Her research focuses on developing, implementing, and assessing the efficacy of water and sanitation interventions in developing countries and emergency contexts. Lantagne has worked as a Public Health Engineer at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and as the Programs Director of the Ipswich River Watershed Association.

Amy Pickering

Assistant Professor
Civil & Environmental Engineering

Dr. Pickering is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at Tufts. Her research is interdisciplinary, combining useful tools from the fields of engineering, epidemiology, and microbiology. Pickering focuses her studies in enteric disease transmission pathways among households in low-income countries and how to identify low-cost and scalable interventions to interrupt them. In addition to disease transmission, she also studies the links between the changing climate and waterborne transmissions of human pathogens.

Helen Suh

Professor
Civil & Environmental Engineering

Dr. Suh is a professor in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering and an expert in the health effects of air pollution and environmental exposure assessment. Her research focuses in the health effects of air pollution, including: understanding the impact of lifestyle and neighborhoods on air pollutant exposures and human health; study of multi-pollutant impacts on human health; and development of GIS-based spatio-temporal modeling tools for epidemiological research.

Electrical and Computer Engineering

Eric Miller

Department Chair
Electrical & Computer Engineering

Dr. Miller is the Department Chair in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Tufts. He received his Ph. D from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Dr. Miller’s research focuses on physics-based signal and image processing and inverse problems. Some of the applications of this research are medical imaging and image analysis, environmental monitoring and remediation, landmine and unexploded ordinance remediation, and automatic target detection and classification.

Aleksander Stankovic

Professor
Electrical & Computer Engineering

Dr. Stankovic is a professor in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, he teaches Power Electronics and Power Systems. His research interests include the analytical and experimental work involving modeling, control, and estimation in electric energy processing and power electronics, power systems, and electric drives. One of his research publications included causes of the 2003 grid blackouts in North America and Europe, and recommended means to improve system dynamic performance.

Thomas Vandervelde

Associate Professor
Electrical & Computer Engineering

Dr. Vandervelde is an associate professor in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering. He received his Ph. D in physics from the University of Virginia. Vandervelde’s research interests include the interaction of light with matter, the physics of nanostructures (semiconductor photonics and electronics) and interfaces, and energy materials such as photovoltaics and thermophotovoltaics. Some of his research in the past has included studies on the progress in infrared photodetectors since 2000.

Innovation and Management

Kevin Oye

Professor of Practice
Business Strategy and Innovation

Professor Oye is a Professor of Practice in Business Strategy and Innovation at the Tufts School of Engineering. He received his bachelor’s in Electrical Engineering from Tufts University. Prior to joining the Tufts faculty, Oye was the Vice President of Systems and Technology at Sycamore Networks, Inc., where he led a global team that created and delivered global and nationwide optical networks for customers such as Sprint and the U.S. Department of Defense.

Mechanical Engineering

Luisa Chiesa

Associate Professor
Mechanical Engineering

Dr. Chiesa is an Associate Professor in the Tufts Department of Mechanical Engineering. She received her Ph. D in Nuclear Engineering from MIT and her bachelor’s in Physics from the Universita’ degli Studi, Milano, Italy. Her primary research focus is superconducting materials for energy application. Her current research is studying the electro-mechanical behavior of superconducting materials used in fusion power devices. Fusion reactors are crucial in the production of power in the future, and superconducting materials are important for the performance of fusion power devices.

Marc Hodes

Associate Professor
Engineering

Dr. Hodes is an Associate Professor in the Department of Engineering at Tufts. He received his bachelor’s, master’s, and Ph. D in mechanical engineering, with his Ph. D completed at MIT. Dr. Hodes’ research focuses in transport phenomena, and four areas within it. These areas include the thermal management of electronics, mass transfer in supercritical fluids, analysis of thermoelectric modules, and analysis of convection in the presence of apparent slip.

Iryna Zenyuk

Assistant Professor
Mechanical Engineering

Dr. Zenyuk is an assistant professor in the Department of Mechanical Engineering. Her research focuses in topics such as the fundamental understanding and novel design of next-generation fuel cells and electrochemical energy storage technologies. Her current interests include advanced computational modeling, the transport of neutral and charged species in porous media, and development of next-generation diagnostic tools for in-situ and ex-situ device component testing.

Michael Zimmerman

Professor of Practice
Mechanical Engineering

Dr. Zimmerman is a Professor of Practice in the Department of Mechanical Engineering. His research focuses in finite elements, and polymer materials and processing. The work involves the development of unique polymer composite material formulations and manipulating their properties to help enable new products to be developed from these properties. Some of his areas of focus are: thermal properties, optical and reflective properties, electrical properties up to 100 Ghz, rheological properties to enable improved manufacturing, and mechanical properties such as impact, ductility, and creep.


Graduate and Professional Schools

Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine

Janetrix Hellen Amuguni

Research Assistant Professor
Infectious Disease and Global Health

Dr. Hellen Amuguni is a Research Assistant Professor in the Department of Infectious Disease and Global Health at the Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine. Currently, as the technical advisor for the USAID RESPOND project in Africa, she coordinates projects across six African countries, and works with 14 public health and veterinary medicine institutions to build the capacity for African countries to counter existing and future infectious disease outbreaks.

Felicia Nutter

Director
International Veterinary Medicine

Dr. Nutter is the Director of International Veterinary Medicine at The Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine. Dr. Nutter works with the RESPOND project in Africa, using a One Health approach, focusing on identifying and countering pandemics within wildlife and livestock before the diseases reach human populations. Her other interests include the intersection of animal, human, and environmental health. She believes that the “collaboration between physicians, researchers, veterinarians, conservationists, public health officials, and educators is essential to ensuring sustainable global health.”

Marieke Rosenbaum

Professor
Veterinary Medicine & Public Health

Dr. Rosenbaum is the Track Leader and professor for the DVM-MPH pathway at the Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine. Her overarching research interests include urban agriculture and animal production, tuberculosis in nonhuman primates, the Peruvian wildlife trade, infectious diseases in urban rodents, and parenting and family planning amongst veterinarians. Some of her selected research projects include the cohabitation with production animals and gut microbiota in Guatemalan children, and urban wild rodents as environmental reservoirs for infectious diseases.

Saul Tzipori

Department Chair
Infectious Disease and Global Health

Dr. Tzipori is the Chair of the Department of Infectious Disease and Global Health at The Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine. His research has focused on viral, bacterial, fungal, and protozoal infectious diseases and toxin-mediated diseases. Some of Dr. Tzipori’s research projects in the past have the biology, pathogenesis, immunology, epidemiology, diagnosis, treatment, prevention and control of cryptosporidiosis and microsporidiosis in children from developing countries, and in individuals with HIV/AIDS.

Christopher Whittier

Research Assistant Professor
Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine

Dr. Whittier is a research assistant professor at The Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine. He is interested in issues of wildlife health with an emphasis on human infectious disease threats to wildlife, wildlife medicine, conservation, African apes, field diagnostics, and epidemiology. Some of Dr. Whittier’s research projects include: health threats to wild gorillas in the Central African Republic, and assisting with the establishment of a coordinated wildlife health program with the Smithsonian Wildlife Health Initiative.

Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy

Paul Berkman

Professor of Practice
Science and Diplomacy

Dr. Berkman is a Professor of Practice in Science and Diplomacy at the Fletcher School. He received his bachelor’s degree in Biology at the University of California, Santa Barbara, and went on to receive his Ph. D in Oceanography at the University of Rhode Island. Professor Berkman’s research focuses on the science and policy relationship and interactions in international governance. Focusing especially on the cooperative management of transboundary resources and international spaces that exist beyond national jurisdictions.

Steven Block

Professor
International Economics; Director of International Development Certificate Program at the Fletcher School

Dr. Block is a Professor of International Economics and the Director of the Program on International Development at the Fletcher School. His research focuses mainly on the policy of food and agriculture in developing nations, and on the political economy of policy reform. Much of his current research focuses on agricultural productivity in sub-Saharan Africa. Dr. Block also studies maternal nutritional knowledge and how it plays a role in determining the nutritional status of children.

Avery Cohn

Assistant Professor
International Environment & Resource Policy

Dr. Cohn is an Assistant Professor of International Environment and Resource Policy at the Fletcher School. His research mainly focuses on the future of agriculture and forests in the changing climate within developing countries. His studies often involve the relationship between earth systems, human behavior, and institutions. Some of his topics of focus are governance of deforestation, projects to promote sustainable intensification of agricultural production, food loss reduction, the strength of diversified farming systems, and crop pests in a changing climate.

Alnoor Ebrahim

Professor
Management

Dr. Ebrahim is a Professor of Management at the Fletcher School. He received his Ph. D and master’s from Stanford University, and his bachelor’s from MIT. His research focuses on and studies the challenges behind performance measurement, accountability, and governance facing organizations with a social purpose. Additionally, he has served on a group created by the G8 to establish global guidelines on measuring social impact, and continues to serve on an advisory board of the Global Impact Investing Network.

William Moomaw

Professor
International Environmental Policy

Dr. Moomaw is a Professor of International Environmental Policy at the Fletcher School. His research interests include: sustainable development, trade and the environment, technological and policy related implications of climate change, the relationship between water and climate change, biodiversity, and negotiation strategies for environmental agreements. Additionally, his research on nitrogen pollution and its effect on human health and other ecosystems has important ties to industry as a whole and how it can address the issue of nitrogen pollution.

Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy

Jennifer Coates

Associate Professor
Food Policy & Applied Nutrition

Dr. Coates is an Associate Professor of Food Policy and Applied Nutrition at the Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy. She received her Ph. D in Food Policy and Applied Nutrition at the Tufts Friedman School. Her research focuses on the methods of improving the structure, application, and evaluation of international nutrition and food security programs. She also conducts research to better understand the implementation and impact of food security programs, which includes identification of models for a sustainable exit from Title II-funded food aid programs.

Christina Economos

Professor
Childhood Nutrition

Dr. Economos is a Professor in Childhood Nutrition at the Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy. She is also the Associate Director of the John Hancock Research Center on Physical Activity, Nutrition, and Obesity Prevention. Her research has tackled the relationship between exercise, diet, body composition, bone health, and the built environment aimed at preventing osteoporosis and obesity in early childhood. Her goal is behavior, policy, and environmental change to increase the health of children in America.

Jerold Mande

Professor of Practice
Friedman School of Nutrition Science & Policy

Professor Mande is Professor of Practice at the Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy. He received a master’s in public health in Nutrition and Epidemiology from The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Mande is piloting an initiative on advocacy, food policy change, and public health impact, understanding that there is a complex intersection between nutrition science and policy. He understands that solely providing people with the correct nutrition information is not sufficient in ensuring public health.

William Masters

Professor
Friedman School of Nutrition Science & Policy; Economics

Dr. Masters is a Professor in the Friedman School, and the Tufts University Department of Economics. He received his master’s and Ph. D from the Food Research Institute at Stanford University. His research focuses on utilizing economic methods to inform and improve the food system, especially those in developing countries. He has worked as an editor for Agricultural Economics and is a co-author of the book, Economics of Agricultural Development: World Food Systems and Resource Use.

Daniel Maxwell

Professor
Food Security

Dr. Maxwell is a Professor in Food Security and a Research Director at the Feinstein International Center at the Friedman School. He heads the research on food security and livelihoods in complex emergencies. His current research surrounds the recurrence of famines in the 21st century, as well as the politics behind declaring and analyzing a famine. Maxwell also studies food security and resilience programming and measurement, and livelihood systems under stress. Before joining the faculty at Tufts, Maxwell worked in East and West Africa in humanitarian organizations and research institutes.

Tufts School of Medicine

Doug Brugge

Professor
Public Health & Community Medicine

Dr. Brugge is a professor of Public Health and Community Medicine at the Tufts School of Medicine. He received his Masters from the Harvard University in industrial hygiene, and went on to receive his Ph. D in Biology at Harvard. He is the director of the Community Assessment of Freeway Exposure and Health, which consists of multiple studies on ultrafine particles from traffic and their effect on the cardiovascular system. Additionally, his research focuses on housing conditions, exposure to second hand smoke, and health and asthma in immigrant and Native American communities.

Janet Forrester

Associate Professor
Public Health & Community Medicine

Dr. Forrester is an Associate Professor of Public Health and Community Medicine at the Tufts School of Medicine. Her research focuses on the study of the interactions between infectious diseases and nutrition in children and people with HIV/AIDS. Dr. Forrester’s expertise is in the fields of water, sanitation, and hygiene research and policy. She has also worked with One Health because of her interest in the role of infectious diseases in settings with limited access to resources.

Jeffrey Griffiths

Professor
Public Health & Community Medicine

Professor Griffiths is a Professor of Public Health and Community Medicine at the Tufts School of Medicine. His research focuses on: the human, animal, and environmental epidemiology of the emerging pathogen Cryptosporidium; the development of a stable measles vaccine for use where there is no refrigeration; the influence of malnutrition and environmental factors, such as air pollution, on common infectious diseases. Dr. Griffith’s research interests have always included waterborne diseases, from the biology of the pathogens to their epidemiology and to public policy and regulation.

School of the Museum of Fine Arts

Dr. Bottinelli teaches Visual and Critical Studies at the SMFA at Tufts. She received her Ph. D from the University of Pisa, Italy in 2008. Her current research focuses in Food and Contemporary Art, and attempts to define Food Art by looking at the different intentions behind including food in sculpture and performance. She also focuses her research on Art and Domesticity in Post-Fascist Italy, looking at how reconstruction, governmental support to nuclear families, and targeting women as consumers has deeply transformed the home.

Sackler School of Graduate Biomedical Sciences

Honorine Ward

Professor of Medicine
Biomedical Sciences

Dr. Ward is a Professor of Medicine at the Sackler School of Graduate Biomedical Sciences. Her lab’s research focuses on the molecular basis of Cryptosporidium-host cell interactions, looking to study the proteins which mediate these interactions and enzymes that post-translationally modify them. Cryptosporidium is an intestinal parasite that causes diarrheal disease worldwide, especially in patients with HIV/AIDS. The long term goal of Dr. Ward’s lab is to determine if these molecules and enzymes could serve as targets for drug or vaccine developments.


Affiliated Institutes

Global Development and Environment Institute

Brian Roach

Senior Research Associate
Global Development & Environmental Institute (GDAE)

Brian Roach is a Senior Research Associate at the Global Development and Environmental Institute at Tufts University. His research has focused on non-market valuation of natural resources, including drinking water quality, water-based recreation, wildlife, and subsistence activities. He currently is working on a few research projects which include the role that large corporations play in a global economy, the distributional implications of tax policy in the United States, and economic inequality.

Stockholm Environment Institute

Annette Huber-Lee

Senior Scientist
SEI - US, Somerville, MA Office

Dr. Huber-Lee is a Senior Scientist for the Stockholm Environment Institute. Her research interests include international and domestic planning and management of environmental and water resources. She is interested by the integration of economic, engineering, and ecological approaches to solving environmental and social problems sustainably. Huber-Lee is also interested in the development of new ways to address environmental policy and natural resource conflict management.

Eric Kemp - Benedict

Senior Scientist
SEI - US, Somerville, MA Office

Dr. Benedict is a co-leader of the Stockholm Environmental Institute’s Initiative on the Water, Energy and Food Nexus. He received his Ph. D in theoretical physics from Boston University. Benedict’s research interests focus on economic analysis for sustainable consumption and production. He has been involved in many topics and projects pertaining to sustainability at regional, national, and global levels. Some of these topics include poverty and income distribution; water, livestock, and land use; and rural livelihoods.