Research

TIE supports interdisciplinary environmental research in three core areas: water, energy and climate, and health. Many students and faculty have received TIE support for their research projects through the academic year and during the summer, and have become affiliated TIE scholars.

Our Environmental Research Grant seeks to unite faculty, graduate, and undergraduate students across institutional boundaries by engaging in collaborative work and addressing a critical area of environmental concern. In the summer of 2016, four projects are underway led by TIE Faculty members John Durant, Avery Cohn, Michael Reed, and Allison Robbins.

TIE’s signature Graduate Environmental Fellowship program supports selected students’ research projects. We currently have ten TIE fellows working on topics as diverse as climate policy, environmental literary criticism, coastal flooding and sea level rise, school-based safe water points, and detection of airborne pollutants.

Eric Scott

Eric Scott Ph.D. Candidate, Biology “A Tipping Point in the Effects of Herbivore Density on the Chemistry and Sensory Quality of Tea (Camilla sinensis)”

A Tipping Point in the Effects of Herbivore Density on the Chemistry and Sensory Quality of Tea (Camilla sinensis)

Jamie Fanous

TIE Fellow 2016-2017 Headshot_Fanous, Jamie

Measuring the Effectiveness of Biochar on Agricultural Practices in Rwanda

Etsy Yanco

TIE Fellow 2016-2017 Headshot_Yanco, Etsy

Tracking the ecological restoration of a newly implemented Wildlife Friendly Alliance near Cobar, New South Wales, Australia

Emma Schneider

Emma Schneider Ph.D. Candidate, English “Listening to Survive: Cultivating Storylisteners in North American Environmental Justice Literature”

Listening to Survive: Cultivating Storylisteners in North American Environmental Justice Literature

Katherine Kurth

Katherine Kurth M.S. Candidate at the Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine

The Rains Down in Africa

TIE has also supported large-scale research such as the Solar Decathlon, which was an international competition of 20 university student teams competing to design, build, and operate the most attractive, effective, and energy-efficient solar-powered house. Over 100 Tufts students from engineering, urban planning, environmental studies, policy, and other disciplines were involved with the research, design, construction, and communications for the Team Boston Curio House, which competed in Washington, D.C.